How to Jack Up a Dual Axle Travel Trailer

A dual axle or tandem axle travel trailer can give you quite a few advantages on the road. They usually come with superior suspensions which makes them more stable on highways. You don’t have to worry too much about bouncing or swaying.

They are also equipped with brakes and capable of hauling larger loads. The tires also last longer due to the extra support provided by the dual axle. However, even though flat tires are less common with dual axle travel trailers, you have to prepare yourself in the event that it does happen.

Learning how to jack up a dual axle travel trailer the right way is important not just so you can do it safely, but also so that you can do it quickly and get right back on the road. Often times, only one tool is a must-have.

Necessary Tools

Step-by-Step Guide – Using the Tire Ramp

Finding a hard surface

You will need to find a hard level surface in order to maintain stability while working on the trailer. Loosen the lug nuts on the flat tire.

Positioning the ramp

Put the tire ramp in front of the inflated tire. Prepare to pull the trailer forward if you want to work on a rear tire. Do the opposite if you have a flat on a front tire. Make sure that the tow vehicle, trailer, and ramp are perfectly aligned.

Elevating the trailer

To elevate the trailer, you’ll have to drive slowly until the good tire that’s next to the flat tire reaches the top of the tire ramp.

Securing the trailer

To secure the trailer, put your car in park and pull the handbrake.

Changing the tire

Remove the flat tire and mount your spare. Drive off the tire ramp and then secure the lug tightly on both wheels.

You may want to lubricate the studs before putting back the lug nuts. Check the tire pressure too if this is the first time you’re using the spare.

Tips and Warnings

Using a tire ramp as opposed to the traditional jack makes things a lot easier. You don’t have to worry about the weight of the trailer and you won’t need to put elbow grease into raising the trailer.

With a tire ramp, you don’t have to raise both wheels. As the good tire climbs the ramp, the flat tire also elevates off the ground. The separation between the two wheels and the 2 to 3 inches of elevation for the flat tire should give you enough room to work.

A good tire ramp might also come in handy when trying to unstuck tires in snow or mud.

Final Thoughts

When the tires aren’t spinning or flexing, the static load of an elevated RV isn’t something to worry about. So, not only do ramps help you save storage space and reduce the weight of the trailer load, but they’re also designed to minimize the damage done to the good tire when changing a flat.

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